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MM 09

Newcastle Ban Lifted + Biosecurity Tips

by | Jun 9, 2020 | Meyer Moment

Let’s take a Meyer Moment to talk about Newcastle Disease and the recent quarantine lift in Southern California! After a very long year and half, the CDFA has officially announced an end to the Newcastle Disease quarantine, allowing poultry to move freely within California. Congratulations Southern California residents, your new additions are awaiting! 

So how can you prevent the reintroduction of widespread disease and risk of quarantine? Biosecurity. We have a few biosecurity tips any level poultry owner can implement today!

Read Full Episode Transcript

Hey everyone! Welcome back to The Coop with Meyer Hatchery – where we talk all things poultry in hopes of inspiring crazy chicken keepers and educating future flock owners. Each week we like to take a Meyer Moment to cover relevant happenings. 

Let’s take a Meyer Moment to talk about Newcastle Disease and the recent quarantine lift in Southern California! 

For those of you unaware, Newcastle Disease was first detected in Southern California in May of 2018. By December of that year the virus had spread extensively through backyard and commercial flocks. There is no cure for the disease, leading to infected poultry being humanely euthanized. Unfortunately, this is the only way to stop the spread of the disease.

Last year a ban was put into effect, by the California Department of Food and Agriculture in conjunction with the United States Postal Service, to limit the movement of poultry in and out of Southern California. This meant no hatchery, including Meyer Hatchery, could serve their customers in this area. 

After a very long year and half, the CDFA has officially announced an end to the Newcastle Disease quarantine, allowing poultry to move freely within California. Congratulations Southern California residents, your new additions are awaiting!

So how can you prevent the reintroduction of widespread disease and risk of quarantine? Biosecurity.

Regardless of where you live or your experience as a poultry keeper, following these tips will help keep you, your flock, and community healthy.

First, maintain a closed flock. Meaning new poultry should only be brought in from sources that are  (NPIP) National Poultry Improvement Plan tested clean. By allowing birds from other farms or attracting wild birds can easily spread disease. 

Next. Don’t move poultry off your property. Now for the average person, this is easy but for those of you who take birds to poultry shows, fairs, and other exhibits, be aware that you run the risk of possible infection. To be safe, quarantine your poultry, for a minimum of three weeks when you return, to watch for any signs of illness. 

Third. Designate a pair of poultry shoes. Running into town in your farm boots is the fastest way to spread diseases. Also, don’t wear your street shoes into your poultry area. Disease is commonly spread through bodily fluids, especially feces. It can be easy to indirectly spread disease, by picking up germs at your feed or hardware stores. 

Lastly, clean and disinfect. Germs love to populate in wet conditions. Be sure to regularly disinfect your feeders and waterers with a 10% bleach solution. It’s also important to wash your hands after touching poultry, eggs, and after coop cleanings. 

We hope these simple tips will help you improve your biosecurity today! And that’s your weekly Moment with Meyer. 

Enjoy the rest of your week and as always thank you for listening!

Hosts & Guests

Kendra + Jeff
From Meyer Hatchery

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