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MM 24

Seasonal Shift

by | Sep 29, 2020 | Meyer Hatchery

Let’s take a Meyer Moment to talk about the seasonal shift! The autumnal equinox has arrived, meaning fall has officially begun for the Northern Hemisphere. As the season shifts, the sun will begin to rise later and nightfall will approach sooner. Now is the time to layer up in a cozy sweater and hot mug of coffee for your morning chores.

Most believe the fall foliage and amount of eggs your hens lay is due to the change in weather, a common misconception, it’s actually a result of the amount of daylight.

Read Full Episode Transcript

Hey everyone! Welcome back to The Coop with Meyer Hatchery – where we talk all things poultry in hopes of inspiring crazy chicken keepers and educating future flock owners. Each week we like to take a Meyer Moment to cover relevant happenings. 

Let’s take a Meyer Moment to talk about the seasonal shift! The autumnal equinox has arrived, meaning fall has officially begun for the Northern Hemisphere. As the season shifts, the sun will begin to rise later and nightfall will approach sooner. Now is the time to layer up in a cozy sweater and hot mug of coffee for your morning chores.

Most believe the fall foliage and amount of eggs your hens lay is due to the change in weather, a common misconception, it’s actually a result of the amount of daylight. 

That’s right your hen’s egg production, is affected by the hours of daylight they receive. The natural system has its unique ways, to not only encourage hens to produce eggs, when there’s a better chance of offspring survival but to also ration food when the scarcity of winter sets in. 

Hens are signaled to produce eggs by their endocrine system. The shorter day length causes this producing hormone to shut down. To keep egg production from stopping, additional light is needed in the coop to trigger the endocrine system. 

The solution to egg production all winter long? A single, standard lightbulb. You can leave it on 24/7 or cut your energy bill by setting it on a timer. Chickens need a minimum of 14 hours of daylight for continuous egg production.

Now before flipping the switch, consider your hens laying years. A hen is born with all the eggs she’ll ever produce within her lifetime. Continuous laying can easily reduce her laying years drastically. 

If you prefer to give your hens the natural break they deserve, remember you can always freeze eggs when the bounty is plentiful, ensuring you have farm fresh eggs year-round. You can find our preferred methods, of egg preservation linked below in the show notes. 

We hope this information will help you prepare as the season shifts to fall and we hunker down for the winter ahead. And that’s your weekly moment with Meyer. 

Enjoy the rest of your week and as always, thank you for listening to The Coop!

Hosts & Guests

Kendra + Jeff
From Meyer Hatchery

Resources

Ensure Year-Round Egg Supply – blog

Cured Egg Yolks – YouTube

How To Freeze Eggs – YouTube

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