Select Page

MM 33

Determining Hatch Rates

by | Dec 1, 2020 | Meyer Moment

Let’s take a Meyer Moment, to talk about determining hatch rates! The new year is quickly approaching with new availability, so we thought we’d share how Meyer Hatchery determines the number of chicks for each hatch date. 

Read Full Episode Transcript

Hey everyone! Welcome back to The Coop with Meyer Hatchery – where we talk all things poultry in hopes of inspiring crazy chicken keepers and educating future flock owners. Each week we like to take a Meyer Moment to cover relevant happenings. 

Let’s take a Meyer Moment, to talk about determining hatch rates! The new year is quickly approaching with new availability, so we thought we’d share how Meyer Hatchery determines the number of chicks for each hatch date. 

Creating this inventory happens long before the actual hatch and with lots of math involved. First, we must estimate how many eggs we will have available to set in our incubators. This number is determined, based on prior experience, how many hens are residing in our breeding barns, and the average number of eggs laid for each breed, amongst other factors.

Knowing that it takes 21 days for chicken eggs to hatch, in a well-controlled environment, the set days are planned in advance to coordinate with our Monday hatch dates. We hatch on Mondays to ensure your chicks are healthy, upon arrival at the post office. Some hatch dates are scheduled for Tuesdays if a federal holiday falls on that Monday’s hatch.  

With the average number of eggs, we can now determine a certain percentage of eggs likely to hatch, resulting in an approximate number of chicks, we will have available for each breed. 

When those eggs are hatched, we know some will be sold as straight run, and others will be sold as male or female, resulting in our projected availability on our website. 

Using this formula, we can project the number of chicks available based on the breed for each hatch date throughout the year. This estimate is conservative to help avoid disappointment. 

However, working with live animals things don’t always go as planned. If they do not hatch as well as we expected, it could result in what we call hatch date issues. 

When these issues occur, we try to contact our customers as soon as possible and offer an alternative solution, whether that be a comparable breed substitution, shipping the order short, cancelling, or rescheduling the order. 

Other times hatches will go better than expected, resulting in more birds available than projected. Monday mornings our website availability is updated with over hatches, to reflect the most current numbers, allowing you to snag some breeds that may previously have been sold out.  

Limited by the number of eggs, incubator capacity, and hatch rates, you can now see why popular breeds, can easily sell out quickly. Be sure to join our newsletter, linked below, to be the first to know when our annual inventory is released! 

Enjoy the rest of your week and as always, thank you for listening to The Coop!

Hosts & Guests

Kendra + Jeff
From Meyer Hatchery

 Get This Episode

Related Episodes

MM: 38 – Frozen Eggs

MM: 38 – Frozen Eggs

MM 38 Frozen EggsLet’s take a Meyer Moment to talk about frozen eggs. Throughout the winter months as temperatures continue to drop, you’ll also find your egg production reducing. Getting every last precious egg from the coop to the house is of importance. But what...

MM: 37 – Winter Watering

MM: 37 – Winter Watering

MM 37 Winter WateringLet’s take a Meyer Moment to talk about winter watering. In Meyer Moment episode 26 we talked about the various styles of heated waterers. But for first-time flock owners navigating cold conditions or winter elements, you may still be struggling...

0 Comments

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *