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MM 37

Winter Watering

by | Jan 12, 2021 | Meyer Moment

Let’s take a Meyer Moment to talk about winter watering. In Meyer Moment episode 26 we talked about the various styles of heated waterers. But for first-time flock owners navigating cold conditions or winter elements, you may still be struggling to water your flock. Here’s a few tips to help you this winter!

Read Full Episode Transcript

Hey everyone! Welcome back to The Coop with Meyer Hatchery – where we talk all things poultry in hopes of inspiring crazy chicken keepers and educating future flock owners. Each week we like to take a Meyer Moment to cover relevant happenings. 

Let’s take a Meyer Moment to talk about winter watering. In Meyer Moment episode 26 we talked about the various styles of heated waterers. But for first-time flock owners navigating cold conditions or winter elements, you may still be struggling to water your flock. Here’s a few tips to help you this winter!

When watering any poultry type, we recommend keeping their waterer outside or within their run. Keeping water inside the coop can create mold and smelly bedding, and in the winter months, it can also cause a rise in humidity increasing your risk of frostbite.

So how do you maintain fresh, flowing water in below-freezing temperatures and tons of snow.

It takes time, patience, and a little trial and error. Waterers with heated bases, or with heating elements built-in can be used outside if they are kept clear of elements. Meaning you’ll need a covered space in your run, specifically designed for your waterer. In addition, this also means maintaining electricity to this designated area. 

Another great option includes tank de-icers for poultry types like ducks and geese that need a larger area of open water to submerge their bills. De-icers will also need access to electricity but are a bit easier to maintain in areas that often fall into below-freezing temperatures or with high snow totals for extended periods of time. 

Some customers choose to fill their waterer multiple times a day to eliminate the need for heated waterers in the winter. Simply break the ice and add fresh lukewarm water.

If your climate is known for bad snowstorms, consider a hanging heated nipple waterer with cups to reduce spills. This is a great addition to your coop, limiting humidity concerns for a few days until your storm blows over. Once you’re in the clear, move your waterer back outside. 

With a well-ventilated coop, free from drafts, keeping water inside your coop for a few days is fine. Sometimes you have to weigh the pros and cons doing what’s best for the safety of you and your flock. 

Despite all the fancy waterers and tank de-icers, you may want to consider what my co-host Kendra uses, a rubber feeder pan. The rubber helps insulate the bowl slightly, but also increases flexibility to break the ice. She fills it once a day with lukewarm water from the house. 

With that we hope these tips better help you with watering your flock this winter. 

Enjoy the rest of your week and as always, thank you for listening to The Coop!

Hosts & Guests

Kendra + Jeff
From Meyer Hatchery

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