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MM 48

Single Hatchling

by | Mar 30, 2021 | Meyer Moment

Let’s take a Meyer Moment to talk about single hatchlings. There are many factors that can affect the outcome of a hatch and there may be a time when there is only a single hatchling. Poultry is known for its flock tendencies. So in the best interest of a lone bird, there are some special considerations for their health and happiness.

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Hey everyone! Welcome back to The Coop with Meyer Hatchery – where we talk all things poultry in hopes of inspiring crazy chicken keepers and educating future flock owners. Each week we like to take a Meyer Moment to cover relevant happenings. 

Let’s take a Meyer Moment to talk about single hatchlings. There are many factors that can affect the outcome of a hatch and there may be a time when there is only a single hatchling. Poultry is known for its flock tendencies. So in the best interest of a lone bird, there are some special considerations for their health and happiness. 

Initial signs of distress include endless peeping, day and night. This cry for attention from a single hatchling makes regular handling and interaction crucial for this special chick! 

Adding more birds to be brooder mates, would be ideal for a single hatchling, but sometimes it just isn’t possible to quickly find an alternate source for birds. when you had been counting on your own hatch. Broodermates should not have an age difference of any more than 2 weeks, so this leaves a short window of possible additions. 

As an alternative for companionship try adding a mirror for the lone hatchling to gaze upon itself as a brooder mate. You can also try adding a small stuffed animal to act as a friend, and help retain warmth. For comfort try hovering a feather duster over the brooder to mimic the fluffy underside of a mother hen.

If you are not planning to have a chicken as a house pet, this lone hatchling does need to be integrated and socialized with a flock as soon as possible. Be prepared for the single chick to become bonded to their caretaker. This is called imprinting, which we covered in episode 42. 

Once the single hatchling is nearing the end of their brooding period, consider a setup within an existing flock where the chick can be seen but not touched. A pet crate within the coop or even a cornered-off portion of the coop would be ideal for this bird to meet their new friends and actually learn how to be a chicken! 

Raising a single hatchling is not for the faint of heart and does take energy and dedication. But that hard work will be rewarded with a special bond with this unique bird. 

We hope you enjoyed this Meyer Moment about single hatchlings and their unique needs. 

Enjoy the rest of your week and as always, thank you for listening to The Coop!

Hosts & Guests

Kendra + Jeff
From Meyer Hatchery

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