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MM 57

Feed Storage

by | Jun 15, 2021 | Meyer Moment

Let’s take a Meyer Moment to talk about feed storage. If you keep a very large chicken flock, or like to enjoy the discount that is usually included with bulk purchases, you likely have multiple bags of feed to store. There are a few things to consider when storing feed including location and temperature.

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Hey everyone! Welcome back to The Coop with Meyer Hatchery – where we talk all things poultry in hopes of inspiring crazy chicken keepers and educating future flock owners. Each week we like to take a Meyer Moment to cover relevant happenings. 

Let’s take a Meyer Moment to talk about feed storage. If you keep a very large chicken flock or like to enjoy the discount that is usually included with bulk purchases, you likely have multiple bags of feed to store. There are a few things to consider when storing feed including location and temperature.

If stored properly, most chicken feed will last 3-6 months. Keeping food safe during any storage timeframe is paramount for flock health. Feed contaminated with mold, insects, or rodents can make chickens very sick or even kill them. 

Some feeds have different storage requirements and may not last as long as others. Always check feed labels for notes or instructions for any specific storage needs. Most labels will also usually note a manufacturing date and/or an expiration date for reference. 

If you are lucky enough to have a separate storage area like a shed or barn, feed can be stored in its original bag, off of the ground. A pallet works great for this purpose. This prevents the feed from absorbing moisture and also gives a good view of any spilled feed from a torn bag or determined rodent. 

Rodents of all types love chicken feed, and will quickly destroy any stored feed if given the chance. A tell-tale sign of any critter helping themself to the feed is spilled food or ripped open bags. The best defense against rodents is sealed containers. Plastic storage bins or buckets can work, but most critters can eventually chew through plastic. The best option is metal trash cans or containers that are chew-proof to critters with watertight lids.

The temperature of a storage area should be a top consideration. Some like it hot, but chicken feed does not! Cool and dry is ideal for feed storage, below 60 degrees Fahrenheit and out of direct sunlight. Mold grows in warm, moist environments so be sure the storage area doesn’t collect condensation or reach high temperatures.

We hope you enjoyed this Meyer Moment about feed storage and keeping feed fresh and safe for your flock. 

Enjoy the rest of your week and as always, thank you for listening to The Coop!

Hosts & Guests

Kendra
From Meyer Hatchery

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